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February 28, 2014

By Anthony Filomena

PRSSA2What goes into hosting a regional conference? Why is it important and what does it mean for Columbia College students? Talk to the members of Columbia College’s Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) and they will tell you it is a chance for students to showcase their talents outside the classroom with opportunities and lessons that prepare them for future careers in their industry.

Columbia College’s PRSSA is one of 10 chapters to win the opportunity to host a conference, beating out other Midwest universities for the only official PRSSA National-sponsored conference in the Midwest, March 7-8.

“The reason Columbia College’s PRSSA chapter wanted to host a regional conference was because it is a great chance to expose our organization to the national stage, and gives our members an exciting opportunity to gain experience hosting large-scale events,” said Luke Crawford, double major in marketing communication/PR and arts management. “The extensive planning process provides us with first-hand experience and portfolio work to better ourselves as upcoming professionals.”

To host a conference, a chapter had to complete an all-inclusive Regional Conference bid form detailing the logistics, registration and participant process, promotional materials, national initiatives, and define their regional conference committee team. Then they had to pass a 20–minute interview with PRSSA National.

Crawford serves as the PRSSA director of special events and regional conference coordinator. Not only did he help lead the brainstorming sessions and campaign, along with marketing communication/PR student and PRSSA Chapter President David Lee Watta, but the pressure was on him alone to pass the interview process with the PRSSA National committee.

facebookpicture-copy“It was a great professional experience. I knew they had already had quite a few interviews by the time they got to me, but I prepared by truly thinking through as many of the details about the conference and logistics as possible. I had poured my heart and passion into the thought process around the bid, and sometimes, all you can do is hope and believe that you truly gave it your all,” said Crawford.

The inspiration behind the winning bid comes from the chapter’s creative brainstorming sessions that ultimately ended with the fusing of Chicago’s downtown epicenter The Loop with a PR twist, thus giving birth to
The Loop, a 360-Degree Approach to Public Relations, the site they created for the conference.

“These students have all put endless hours into the planning and preparation of this conference. These are smart kids that apply not only what they learn in the classroom but from each other. I have seen so many members go on to have successful career paths and could not be happier,” said PRSSA faculty adviser and Marketing Communication Assistant Professor Anne Marie Mitchell.

PRSSA National agrees that the hard work showed.

“I definitely saw the passion and drive for his PRSSA to be able to host the regional conference. After the conference call interview with PRSSA National President, Brian Price, we were both amazed with the bid and how well prepared [Crawford] was. We knew leaving the interview that Columbia College PRSSA was most likely going to be selected,” said Erica Brown, the vice president of Regional Conferences for PRSSA National.

The Columbia College PRSSA winning conference committee team includes Crawford and Watta as well as, Executive Outreach Liaison Michelle Graven, Community and Chapter Outreach Liaison Rhiannon Austgen, both marketing communication/PR students, and Volunteer Relations Chair Lacey Hopkins, a fashion studies major.

The two-day regional conference will highlight four media components of the PR industry: traditional, digital, lifestyle and new/interactive media. The first day of the conference will feature agency tours and a case study competition sponsored by Ogilvy. The second day will be filled with sessions hosted by industry professionals in the public relations field and conclude with closing remarks by PRSSA National President Brian Price.

Industry speakers set to attend include The Onions’ Derek Cuculich, Purely Fashion’s Ryan Beshel, Obama Twitter Handler Caleb Gardener, BurelleLuce’s Tressa Robbins and Chicago Cubs’ Kevin Saghy.

PRSSA3

Photos courtesy of Columbia College’s PRSSA facebook

 

 

 

 

Posted on Feb 2, 2014

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Exhibit looks at dimension, depth and density

Photo credit: Ika Knezevic

Photo credit: Ika Knezevic

CHICAGO (February 28, 2014) – Columbia College Chicago’s Averill and Bernard Leviton A+D Gallery Virtually Physically Speaking, an exhibition of works that parse out the shifts in perception and reception of the three-dimensional as it relates to both conventional and new technologies.

How do we understand 3-D today? How do we perceive of dimension, depth and density in relation to a corporeal state when our activities are generated, accessed and understood through technologies that assume or define dimensions beyond the tangible?

Currently, we are participating in a world – both globally and locally – that adopts the language of 3-D as adjective and verb, used to describe enhanced states, or even just pragmatic states, of things, non-things, and actions alike. We are experiencing the space beyond the monitor as an ever-present palpable site/arena/atmosphere that we ‘visit/navigate/get to/experience”.

Ultimately, the exhibition is proposing an amalgamation of the term “physical” as it is experienced in both virtual and actual space, with virtual and actual things as well as virtual and actual personas. The exhibit is curated by Kelly Kaczynski.

WHEN:
March 6- April 12
Opening Reception 5-8 p.m., March 6

WHERE:
Averill and Bernard Leviton A+D Gallery
619 S. Wabash Ave.
Columbia College Chicago

ARTISTS:
Amanda Bowles
Theodore Darst
Ika Knezevic
Judith Leemann
Todd Mattei
Inigo Manglano Ovalle
Chris Naka
John Neff
Siebren Versteeg

Exhibition Contact: Meg Duguid, Gallery Director, mduguid@colum.edu, 312.369.8686

Gallery Hours: Tuesday – Saturday: 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thursday: 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
For more information, visit: www.colum.edu/ADGallery

Kelly Kaczynski is a sculptor and installation artist residing in Chicago. She has exhibited with venues such as Soap Factory, MN; Comfort Station, IL; Eastern Washington University and Spokane Community College, WA; Islip Art Museum, NY; Josee Bienvenu Gallery, NY; DeCordova Museum, MA; Boston Center for the Arts, MA. Public installations include projects with the Main Line Art Center, Haverford, PA; the Interfaith Center, NY; Institute for Contemporary Art, Boston and the Boston National Historic Parks, MA; Boston Public Library, MA. Kaczynski received an MFA from Bard College, NY and BA from The Evergreen State College, WA. She is assistant professor in the Department of Art Theory and Practice at Northwestern University.

The Averill and Bernard Leviton A+D Gallery is part of the Art + Design Department at Columbia College Chicago. The gallery’s mission is to present professional exhibitions and educational programming that encompasses the broadest possible definition of visual art and design. This is a direct reflection of the pedagogical diversity of the Art + Design Department and the vast array of ideas, media, and techniques explored by artists today. The gallery presents emerging and established artists whose work reflects any of the disciplines taught in the department including Fine Arts, Interior Architecture, Illustration, Advertising Art Direction, Product Design, Graphic Design and Art History.

Columbia College Chicago is an urban institution that offers innovative degree programs in the visual, performing, media and communication arts for more than 10,000 students in 120 undergraduate and graduate programs. An arts and media college committed to a rigorous liberal arts curriculum, Columbia is dedicated to opportunity and excellence in higher education. For further information, visit www.colum.edu.

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Media Contacts:
Steve Kauffman, 312.369.7383, skauffman@colum.edu

Posted on Feb 2, 2014

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Kent State University Dean Stanley T. Wearden, Ph.D., to assume duties on July 1, overseeing college-wide academic affairs, enrollment management and admissions

Stan Wearden

Stan Wearden

CHICAGO (Feb. 26, 2014) – Columbia College Chicago has appointed Stanley T. Wearden, Ph.D., as its next senior vice president and provost, the chief academic officer for the institution. Wearden, currently a dean at Kent State University, will take office on July 1, according to an announcement today from the college’s President and CEO Kwang-Wu Kim, D.M.A.

Now serving as dean of the College of Communication and Information and professor of journalism and mass communication at Kent State, Wearden in his new role will work with Kim to lead Columbia College’s academic affairs enterprise.

“Stan will not only be an outstanding provost, but he will be an exemplary strategic academic partner to me,” said Kim. “In addition to his skills and experience, he brings great personal and professional integrity and deep moral convictions about the responsibilities of an institution of higher education to all members of its community.”

Among Wearden’s accomplishments during his four-year tenure as dean, he increased college graduate enrollment by 27 percent; grew international undergraduate enrollment by 287 percent; and created scholarships and programs to increase education-abroad participation in the college by more than 1,500 percent.

“Columbia College is an amazing institution with a passionate, engaged faculty, staff, administration and student body,” Wearden said. “I believe I have found an extraordinary academic home, and I enthusiastically look forward to working with Dr. Kim and his team to make this very special institution even greater than it is now.”

Wearden served as director of the School of Communications Studies at Kent State from 2005 until he was named dean in 2009. He began his career at Kent State in 1984 and spent 20 years on the faculty of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. During that time, he was coordinator of graduate studies for 11 years and served as chair of the Institutional Review Board.

Wearden holds a B.A. degree in English from Wheeling College (now Wheeling Jesuit University). His graduate work includes a M.S.J. degree in journalism from West Virginia University and a doctorate in mass communication research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Louise Love, Ph.D., who has been serving as interim provost and vice president for academic affairs, will continue in that role until July.

About Columbia College Chicago
Columbia College Chicago is an urban institution that offers innovative degree programs in the visual, performing, media and communication arts more than 10,000 students in 120 undergraduate and graduate programs. An arts and media college committed to a rigorous liberal arts curriculum, Columbia is dedicated to opportunity and excellence in higher education. For further information, visit www.colum.edu.

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Media Contacts:
Steve Kauffman, 312.369.7383, skauffman@colum.edu
Cara Birch, 312.369.8695, cbirch@colum.edu

Posted on Feb 2, 2014

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By Anthony Filomena

Stephen Lacy, adjunct faculty member in Cinema Art + Science, Dawoud Bey, professor in Photography, Marc Fischer, Art + Design adjunct and Taisha Paggett, Dance lecturer, secured four of the 103 coveted spots in the 2014 Whitney Biennial. The Biennial, now in its 77th year, runs Mar. 7 – May 25 in New York City.

Stephen Lacy

stephen_lacy_no_jetsLacy, who presents his work under the name Academy Records, was contacted by the Whitney early on in the process. He was asked to consider how he might incorporate the work of Chicago/Indiana artist Matt Hanner. Hanner, a Columbia College alumnus, passed away in 2011. Lacy chose one of Hanner’s audio works, No Jets, which was a response to the government’s grounding of all air traffic immediately following the World Trade Center attacks. The short 16mm subject The Bower is Lacy’s response to it.

“As I explored Matt’s archive I kept coming back to the resonance of this piece and decided that it would be appropriate to include in this exhibition,” he says.

No Jets became the foundation of Lacy’s installation, “The Spectre,” a multi-component piece that explores notions of absence, presence and loss. The installation includes the 16mm short and audio samplings. Lacy will also create a large-scale wall drawing on site.

Dawoud Bey

13797158-largeTwo pairs of photographs from Dawoud Bey: The Birmingham Projectwere selected for the 2014 Whitney Biennial. The Birmingham Project commemorates the 50th anniversary of four girls killed by the bombing at the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church and two boys killed in separate incidents on Sept. 15, 1963.

“You cannot literally reconstruct the past, but by making photographs of young people in Birmingham who were the same ages of the six African-Americans killed that day, and to suggest both the passage of time and the lives those young people never get to live, it’s a way of layering the past and the present,” Bey told Alabama News in Dec. 2012.

37f815c06e355b66Donna De Salvo, Chief Curator and Deputy Director for Programs at the Whitney, noted of the Biennial: “There is little overlap in the artists they have selected and yet there is common ground. This can be seen in their choice of artists working in interdisciplinary ways, artists working collectively, and artists from a variety of generations. Together, the 103 participants offer one of the broadest and most diverse takes on art in the United States that the Whitney has offered in many years.”

Marc Fischer

Malachi_Grave_HighRes2013Fischer’s involvement, presenting on behalf of Public Collectors, focuses on the life and work of Malachi Ritscher. Ritscher was a Chicago-based documentarian, activist, artist, musician, photographer, hot-pepper-sauce maker, and supporter of experimental and improvised music.

Fischer’s inclusion of Ritscher’s work ties in to the mission statement of Public Collectors. “I want to share something that the public may not know exists and to see the museum lend authority and importance to a life and a creative practice that probably would not receive museum consideration under normal circumstances,” he says.

Fischer’s complete presentation includes borrowing a number of items from the Creative Audio Archive at Experimental Sound Studio in Chicago, including concert posters that belonged to Ritscher, and 8 briefcases he owned that were filled with cassettes and DAT tapes at the time of his death. Fischer will also offer free copies of an essay that he wrote profiling Ritscher’s career success and his personal connection to him.

“This project has been one of the most challenging and emotionally demanding things I have ever worked on. I’m happy to say that it is not something I am doing alone,” said Fischer.

For a complete list of those contributing to the Public Collectors exhibition, visit Public Collectors Tumblr

Taisha Paggett

Vox Populi photo by Brent Wahl 5Paggett’s performance builds on a series of works that she has developed over the past 3 years and is based upon a trans-historical figure that she calls Fila Buster. The work views repetition and time as two, through body and space, and employs those forms as conceptual and choreographic devices.

Fila Buster’s perspective is drawn from a Black American experience and is “the embodiment of a sphere of desires and questions around knowledge, language, our ability to extract practices of liberation from everyday actions and activities and the possibility of unfixing historical narratives as a way of creating new understandings of self and community,” said Paggett.

The Whitney Museum of American Art is the world’s leading museum of twentieth-century and contemporary art of the United States. Focusing particularly on works by living artists, the Whitney is celebrated for presenting important exhibitions and for its renowned collection, which comprises over 19,000 works by more than 2,900 artists.

For more information on the exhibition, visit http://whitney.org/

Images from top:
The Bower featured in Stephen Lacy’s “The Spectre”
Braxton McKinney and Lavone Thomas, diptych in Dawoud Bey’s “The Birmingham Project”
Maxine Adams and Amelia Maxwell, diptych in Dawoud Bey’s “The Birmingham Project”
Malachi Ritscher’s Gravestone, Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, Ill., Nov. 3, 2013. Photograph by Marc Fischer.
Decomposition as a Whole presented by Taisha Paggett

Posted on Feb 2, 2014

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Featured authors include Cristina Garcia, Barry Gifford;
Guild Literary Complex hosts events spotlighting Latino authors

StoryWeekLogo (2)

CHICAGO (Feb. 17, 2014) – Columbia College Chicago’s 18th annual Story Week Festival of Writers, returns Mar. 16-21 with a focus on DiverCity: Urban Stories. In Story Week tradition, the festival brings established and emerging authors together to share their works in a variety of venues – including Revolution Brewery, Martyrs’, Humboldt Park Fieldhouse, Harold Washington Library, Metro Chicago and the Chicago Cultural Center in addition to Columbia College.

“A city is its people and the stories, real and imagined, through which they tell their lives, their histories, their cultures and their place in the world,” said Randy Albers, founder of Story Week and chair emeritus of the fiction program at Columbia College. “This year’s festival brings together shared stories that shape our understanding of the city and the wider social and historical context of which we are a part.”

With nearly a dozen new books in the works – some of which will be published in the spring and summer – this year’s festival gives a sneak peek at some of 2014’s soon-to-be talked about authors. The Guild Complex also joins Story Week this year to host events spotlighting Latino authors.

Highlights of the week-long festival include:

Featured reading and book signing with Cristina Garcia author of six novels, including King of Cuba (Scribner’s, 2013), Garcia was the former Miami bureau chief for Time Magazine before becoming a novelist. She is the winner of the Janet Heidiger Kafka Prize and her novel Dreaming in Cuban (Knopf, 1992) was a National Book Award finalist. Harold Washington Library, Mar. 18, 6 p.m.

Conversation with screenwriter and novelist Barry Gifford lauded as a “master,” an “American original” and renowned for shaping the American neo-noir genre, Gifford is both screenwriter (Lost Highway and Wild at Heart with David Lynch) and prominent, award-winning author of fiction, nonfiction and poetry whose works have been published in 28 languages. His most recent collection, The Roy Stories, was published by Seven Stories Press, October 2013.

“Translation Matters” and “Noche de novelas/Night of Novels” hosted by the Guild Complex – features seven Latino authors, including Cristina Garcia and Valeria Luiselli. Luiselli, born in Mexico City and raised in South Africa, will share stories from her first U.S. published work, Faces in the Crowd and Sidewalks (forthcoming: Coffee House Press, May 2014).

Literary Rock & Roll – features Eric May (Bedrock Faith, Akashic Books, March 2014), Preston Allen (Every Boy Should Have a Man, Akashic Books, 2013) and Christine Sneed (Little Known Facts, 2013). The Street Sounds Band will also honor the work of David Hernandez (1946-2013), former bandleader and Chicago poet with readings by Achy Obejas, Edwardo Arocho, Marta Collazo and Carlos Cumpián.

Conversation: “Why the Short Story?” – features Christine Sneed (Little Known Facts, Bloomsbury USA, 2013) Stuart Dybek (Ecstatic Cahoots and Paper Lantern, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, June 2014), Roxane Gay (An Untamed State, Grove Press, May 2014) and Katey Schultz (Flashes of War, Apprentice House, 2013). Harold Washington Library, Mar. 17, 2 p.m.

Chicago Classics with Rick Kogan – Legendary Chicago Tribune journalist and WGN-AM radio host Rick Kogan gathers special guests to read from works by their favorite Chicago authors.

This year also features a number of opportunities for aspiring writers to learn more about the publishing industry with bootcamps, readings and open mics. Please visit www.colum.edu/storyweek for a full listing of programs.

Columbia College Chicago is an urban institution that offers innovative degree programs in the visual, performing, media and communication arts for more than 10,000 students in 120 undergraduate and graduate programs. An arts and media college committed to a rigorous liberal arts curriculum, Columbia is dedicated to opportunity and excellence in higher education. For further information, visit www.colum.edu.

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Media contacts:
Cara Birch, cbirch@colum.edu, 312.369.8695
Steve Kauffman, skauffman@colum.edu, 312.369.7383

Posted on Feb 2, 2014

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Reservations open January 31 for last event of 2013-14 series on comedy and improv

JOAN RIVERS_

MEDIA ALERT: Joan Rivers’ contract does not allow for personal media interviews; however, reporters are invited to attend and cover the 6 p.m. event.

CHICAGO (Jan. 30, 2014)—Columbia College Chicago’s comedy-focused Conversations in the Arts series ends its 2013-14 session with iconic comedian, CEO, talk-show host, actress, author and Second City alumna Joan Rivers on Feb. 25. On-line reservations open Jan. 31 at www.colum.edu/conversations.

Aside from winning NBC’s Celebrity Apprentice in 2009, Rivers is most widely known for her red carpet awards show commentary and interviews. She currently hosts E! News Channel’s  Fashion Police, a critical look at the week’s celebrity fashion hits and misses. Additionally, Rivers is CEO of Joan Rivers Worldwide, which produces some of home shopping giant QVC’s most successful fashion, jewelry, apparel and accessories brands.

Rivers was born Joan Alexandra Molinksy in Brooklyn, N.Y., and later took on the stage name of Joan Rivers as she started her stand-up career. Before she became an entertainment legend, she trained at Chicago’s Second City. She has gone on to become an Emmy Award-winning television talk-show host, a Tony Award-nominated actress and bestselling author of The Life and Hard Times of Heidi Abramowitz and I Hate Everyone… Starting with Me.

Rivers made television history in 1986 when she became the first woman to host her own late night talk show, The Late Show Starring Joan Rivers, on the FOX Network after being the only permanent guest host on NBC’s The Tonight Show from1983-86.

This is the 10th year of the Conversations in the Arts series at Columbia College. Free and open to the public, the series offers in-depth dialogue with some of the world’s most notable cultural figures in an intimate setting.

WHEN:
Feb. 25, 6 p.m.

WHERE:
Film Row Cinema
Columbia College Chicago
1104 S. Wabash Ave., Eighth Floor

ADMISSION: This event is free and open to the public. Theater seating is limited.
RSVP at www.colum.edu/conversations.

INFO: For questions or additional information, write to eventquestions@colum.edu.

Columbia College Chicago is an urban institution that offers innovative degree programs in the visual, performing, media and communication arts for more than 10,000 students in 120 undergraduate and graduate programs. An arts and media college committed to a rigorous liberal arts curriculum, Columbia is dedicated to opportunity and excellence in higher education. For further information, visit www.colum.edu.

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Media Contacts:    

Steve Kauffman, 312.369.7383, skauffman@colum.edu

Cara Birch, 312.369.8695, cbirch@colum.edu

Posted on Jan 1, 2014

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Sarah Frost_Discarded

Sarah Frost, Column VIII, 2008, discarded telephones, cords, jacks and receivers

CHICAGO (Jan. 24, 2014)—Columbia College Chicago’s Arcade gallery presents Discarded: The Afterlife of Everyday Electronics, now open through Mar. 7.  The exhibition examines how artists address issues ranging from planned obsolescence of technology, the proliferation of unwanted electronics being re-appropriated as art materials and the feeling of nostalgia for “rejected” vintage items.

Featuring works by artists based in Chicago and across the United States, this multimedia exhibition uses performances, interactive arts, mixed media, time-based works, and installations to display the excess of outdated electronic devices that often find a new life after being left behind.

WHEN: 
Through Mar. 7
Reception: Feb. 13, 5-8pm.
(Note: Best media opportunity is during and after the reception.)

WHERE:
The Arcade Gallery
Columbia College Chicago
618 S. Michigan Ave, 2nd Floor

WHO:
Participating artists:
Veronica Corzo-Duchardt
Nate Crumpley
Kyle Evans and James Connolly
Eric Fleischauer
Sarah Frost
INDO
Patrick Lichty
The Post Family
Maria Tzeka

Exhibition Contact: Mark Porter, mporter@colum.edu, 312-369-6643

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

For more information, visit: www.colum.edu/deps

Columbia College Chicago is an urban institution that offers innovative degree programs in the visual, performing, media and communication arts for more than 10,000 students in 120 undergraduate and graduate programs. An arts and media college committed to a rigorous liberal arts curriculum, Columbia is dedicated to opportunity and excellence in higher education. For further information, visit www.colum.edu.

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Media Contact:
Cara Birch, 312.369.8695, cbirch@colum.edu

Posted on Jan 1, 2014

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Ambitious social practice art exhibition in Chicago tackles myriad of topics from gun violence to defining “happiness” in the 48th ward

Samantha Hill Great Migration 2

Samantha Hill, Great Migration, 2012

CHICAGO (Feb. 11, 2014)—Columbia College Chicago’s ambitious new exhibition, RISK: Empathy, Art and Social Practice, running Feb. 10 – April 26, presents a city-wide look at art as an agent for social change. The exhibition features more than 60 artworks and performances by established and emerging artists engaging in various political and social issues in Chicago.

“Chicago is renowned for being on the cutting edge of socially engaged art, and the artists involved in this exhibition are profoundly diverse in their practice and subjects,” said Neysa Page-Lieberman, co-curator of RISK and director of exhibition and performance spaces at Columbia College. “This has been an exciting challenge to present all together, but with the collaboration and support of partners across the city, RISK showcases some of the most influential artists working in this art form today.”

With support from the Joyce Foundation, the exhibition involves an unprecedented activation of more than 25 museums, galleries, schools, community centers, businesses and other non-traditional art spaces across Chicago, including the Museum of Contemporary Art, 6018North, Hyde Park Art Center, the Rebuild Foundation, and other organizations and institutions. In these settings, RISK asks artists and audiences alike to engage in a city-wide experience of dialogue and social cooperation exploring topics ranging from Chicago’s gun violence to defining “happiness” in the 48th ward.

RISK presents artwork at the vanguard of the social practice art movement and encompasses a wide breadth of contemporary issues. The recent rise of the movement can trace its roots back to the 1960s, yet today’s artworks are largely influenced by post-9/11, Occupy Wall Street, the Great Recession, the fight for marriage equality, immigration and other contemporary social issues.

“Social practice art challenges conventional notions of art ownership and the expectations of an object-oriented experience,” said Amy M. Mooney, co-curator of RISK and associate professor in Art + Design at Columbia College. “This exhibition invites viewer participation that reveals the reciprocal nature of the artistic process, hopefully leaving audiences with indelible marks on civic consciousness and political enfranchisement.”

The exchange between artist and audience, and the unique storytelling projects that sometimes spend years in development, like Kirsten Leenar’s Not In Another Place, But This Place… (Happiness) has presented an ongoing challenge for some institutions presenting art conceived outside of traditional formats. Yet, in Chicago, community engagement has long played a central role in the city’s cultural scene. From art classes at the Hull House to the establishment of the South Side Community Art Center, art has been and continues to be viewed as a shared social experience.

The divergent practices of the artists in the exhibition also reflect the significant role that risk and empathy play in their work, encouraging audiences to take action in ways they may have never considered before. RISK is highly experimental, with uncertain outcomes on any given topic. For some artists, their installation could take an entirely different direction between the opening and closing of the show, all depending on the input and participation of audience.

In order to cover the breadth of issues the artists explore, the exhibition weaves together installations and performances throughout the city—from Hyde Park, Bronzeville and the South Loop to Albany Park, Edgewater and more.

Highlights of the exhibition include:

• Alberto Aguilar’s Lunch Room Expanse and A Personal Dinner Invitation: A Wedding to an Unknown Couple, the latter of which invites a real-life couple who responds to a Craigslist ad to have a wedding ceremony and celebration with 100 strangers invited by the artist.
• Samantha Hill’s Topographical Depictions of the Bronzeville Renaissance, which documents past and current stories from the Great Migration to the current arts and cultural resurgence at multiple installations at Hyde Park Art Center, Blanc Gallery and Glass Curtain Gallery and performances at Parkway Ballroom and Sacred Keepers Youth Garden.
• Kirsten Leenaar’s Not In Another Place, But This Place… (Happiness) a three-channel video installation, whose cast members include police officers, students, community activists from the 48th ward, and Alderman Harry Osterman, who ask: who is responsible for happiness? A live screening and performance will be featured at 6018NORTH.
• Faheem Majeed’s Shacks and Shanties which serves as a temporary home and collaborative platform for artist interventions, performances and community engagement.
• Cheryl Pope’s Just Yell continues the artist’s exploration of ways to visualize the voices of Chicago youth who are impacted by gun violence. Pope and students from ChiArts and the MCA Creative Teen Agency will stage a series of performances and events including a memorial parade called Silence the Silence.

ARTISTS:
Alberto Aguilar, Jim Duignan, Industry of the Ordinary, Samantha Hill, Kirsten Leenaars, Faheem Majeed, Cecil McDonald, Jr., Jennifer Mills, Cheryl Pope, Museum of Contemporary Phenomenon, Potluck: Chicago, Fereshteh Toosi.

EXHIBITION PARTNERS:
6018North, Hyde Park Art Center, Museum of Contemporary Art and the Rebuild Foundation.

ARTIST COLLABORATORS:
Blanc Gallery, Bronzeville Historical Society, Civic Lab, Chicago High School for the Arts, En Las Tablas Performing Arts, From the Roots (formerly known as Social Innovation Advocates), GARLIC & GREENS, Garfield Park Conservatory, Harold’s Chicken, Hemlock of Illinois, Khalfani of Impolite Society, Lindblom Arts and Science Academy, Margaret Burroughs Collective, North Branch Projects, ONO, Parkway Ballroom, Ron Kobold 746 Studios, Sacred Keepers Sustainability Youth Garden, Sarah E. Goode STEM Academy, Spanglish Mexican Kitchen, South Shore Chamber of Commerce, Territory Urban Design Team, and University of Illinois Extension’s Master Gardener Program.

OPENING RECEPTION:
Feb. 13, 2014
5:30 – 8:30 p.m.
Glass Curtain Gallery
Columbia College Chicago
1104 S. Wabash

MEDIA CONTACT: Cara Birch, cbirch@colum.edu, 312.369.8695

RELATED PROGRAMMING: Please visit www.colum.edu/RISK

EXHIBITION CONTACT: Justin Witte jwitte@colum.edu, 312.369.8177

EXHIBITION HOURS: (varies by venue)
Glass Curtain Gallery: Monday-Wednesday and Friday 9-5, Thursday 9-7, Saturday noon-5

Glass Curtain Gallery, located in the historic Ludington building, exhibits emerging and mid-career, national and international artists in all media. The gallery presents museum-quality exhibitions, workshops and visiting artist lectures all of which help to create a dialogue essential to the development and growth of students within the arts.

Columbia College Chicago is an urban institution that offers innovative degree programs in the visual, performing, media and communication arts for more than 10,000 students in 120 undergraduate and graduate programs. An arts and media college committed to a rigorous liberal arts curriculum, Columbia is dedicated to opportunity and excellence in higher education. For further information, visit www.colum.edu.

The Joyce Foundation supports the development of policies that both improve the quality of life for people in the Great Lakes region and serve as models for the rest of the country. We focus on today’s most pressing problems while also informing the public policy decisions critical to creating opportunity and achieving long-term solutions. The work is based on sound research and is focused on where we can add the most value. We encourage innovative and collaborative approaches with a regional focus and the potential for a national reach. The Culture Program works to improve communities through the arts, diversify arts audiences, and support new works by artists of color through the Joyce Awards. Learn more at joycefdn.org.

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Posted on Jan 1, 2014

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Guerrilla Girls

CHICAGO (Jan. 16, 2014)—This expansive multimedia traveling exhibition illustrates that the work of the Guerrilla Girls continues to be vital and revolutionary. Not Ready to Make Nice: Guerrilla Girls in the Artworld and Beyond, a presentation by the Guerrilla Girls, illuminates and contextualizes the important historical and ongoing work of these anonymous, provocative and influential artists who champion feminism and social change. A selection of the group’s most iconic campaigns and actions from the ‘80’s and ‘90’s foreground their most daring and rarely seen international projects which trace the Guerrilla Girls’ artistic and activist influence around the globe.

The exhibition’s installations include documentary material from famous actions, behind-the-scenes photos and secret anecdotes that reveal the Guerrilla Girls’ process and the events that drive their incisive institutional interventions. Visitors can peruse the artists’ favorite “love letters and hate mail,” drawn from almost three decades of humorous, heart-warming and shocking communications, and are invited to contribute their own views to an interactive wall installation.

The Guerrilla Girls were Fall 2011 Institute Fellows with the Ellen Stone Belic Institute for the Study of Women and Gender in the Arts and Media. This six-venue, two-year exhibition has been or will be on view in Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana and Massachusetts.

WHEN/WHERE:

Krannert Art Museum, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Champaign, Illinois
Jan. 24 – Apr. 6, 2014

Thomas J. Walsh Art Gallery, Fairfield University
Fairfield, Connecticut
Sep. 1 – Nov. 15, 2014

Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia
Athens, Georgia
Dec. 6, 2014 – Mar. 1, 2015

The Richard E. Peeler Art Center, DePauw University
Greencastle, Indiana
Sep. 3 – Dec. 11, 2015

Previous venues include:

Glass Curtain Gallery and Art + Design Gallery, Columbia College Chicago
Columbia College Chicago
Mar. 1 – Apr. 21, 2012

Montserrat College of Art Galleries, Montserrat College of Art
Beverly, Massachusetts
Aug. 25 – Dec. 15, 2012

WHO:
The Guerilla Girls are “a bunch of anonymous females who take the names of dead women artists as pseudonyms and appear in public wearing gorilla masks.” The feminist-activist collective has been wreaking havoc in the artworld since 1985. The Not Ready to Make Nice tour was curated and organized by Columbia College’s Director of Exhibitions, Performance and Student Spaces, Neysa Page-Lieberman.

Exhibition Contact: Neysa Page-Lieberman, npage-lieberman@colum.edu, 312.369.7696
For more information, please visit: Columbia College Chicago Guerrilla Girls

Columbia College Chicago is an urban institution that offers innovative degree programs in the visual, performing, media and communication arts for more than 10,000 students in 120 undergraduate and graduate programs. An arts and media college committed to a rigorous liberal arts curriculum, Columbia is dedicated to opportunity and excellence in higher education. For further information, visit www.colum.edu.

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Media Contact:
Cara Birch, 312.369.8695, cbirch@colum.edu

Posted on Jan 1, 2014

Post by Media Relations Assistant

Categories: Press Releases 0 Comments

First major exhibition of its kind charts evolution of hand papermaking by artists in the United States, Mexico, Venezuela, Kosovo and the Philippines

Social paper

From left, works by Julia Goodman, Combat Paper and Cathy Mooses

CHICAGO (Jan. 8, 2014)—Columbia College Chicago’s Center for Book and Paper Arts (CBPA) presents Social Paper, Feb. 10 – Apr. 15. The first major exhibition of its kind, Social Paper charts the evolution of the art of hand papermaking in relation to socially engaged art by artists working in the United States, Mexico, Venezuela, Kosovo and the Philippines.

Featuring sculpture, paper and video works, and other installations, the exhibition contextualizes the site specificity, labor and craft of hand papermaking with the collaborative, community-driven aspects of contemporary art practice. The exhibition is curated by Jessica Cochran and Melissa Potter.

Highlights include artworks and ephemera from the archive of the Combat Paper project, which facilitates workshops for veterans who pulp their uniforms worn in service, transforming them into works of paper-based art; Maggie Puckett’s project, The Big Here, a participatory paper installation that raises awareness about the ecological identity of Chicago; and, historic paper works by artist Alison Knowles from the Women’s Studio Workshop’s Art Farm. Additionally, the exhibition marks the debut of a new paper animation by artist Laura Anderson Barbata (Mexico), whose ongoing project, A Homecoming for Julia, has garnered international attention.

Social Paper is an exhibition that spans across Chicago, with events and installations held in conjunction with the Museum of Contemporary Art, The Poetry Foundation, Chicago Zine Fest, Columbia College Chicago Library and at the CBPA’s own Papermaker’s Garden, a public space located in the heart of the South Loop. This exhibition has received funding from the Craft Research Fund, Clinton Hill/Allen Tran Foundation, and Art+Activism, as well as programming support from the Caxton Club of Chicago.

WHEN:
Feb. 10 – Apr. 15
Opening reception: Feb. 13, 5-8 p.m.
In conjunction with the College Art Association Conference

WHERE:
Center for Book and Paper Arts
1104 S. Wabash Ave, 2nd floor
Columbia College Chicago

WHO:
Loreto Apilado and Trisha Martin
Laura Anderson Barbata
Kim Berman
Combat Paper
Nick Dubois
Parents Circle – Families Forum
Fresh Press
Julia Goodman
Sheroanawë Hakihiiwë
Cathy Mooses
Peace Paper
Maggie Puckett
John Risseeuw
Kiff Slemmons
The People’s Library
Women’s Studio Workshop (Art Farm)

PUBLIC EVENTS:

The Big Here: Chicago
Tuesday, February 11, 6-8pm
Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago
220 E Chicago Ave, Free
A participatory installation by Maggie Puckett for the MCA Tuesday Evening Series

The People’s Library DIY Papermaking Workshops
Thursday, March 13, 5-8pm
Friday, March 14, 10-1pm
1104 S Wabash Ave, 2nd Fl, Free
In conjunction with the Columbia College Chicago Library

Nicholas A. Basbanes: On Paper: The Everything of Its Two Thousand Year History
Tuesday, April 1, 6pm
1104 S Wabash Ave, 2nd Fl, Free
A lecture by award winning writer on his best-selling book charting the global history of paper.

Social Practice Symposium
Saturday, April 12 (times tba)
1104 S Wabash Ave, Free
In collaboration with RISK: Empathy, Art and Social Practice (Glass Curtain Gallery, Columbia College Chicago)

Exhibition Contact: Jessica Cochran, Curator of Exhibitions, jcochran@colum.edu, 312.369.6684

Gallery Hours: Mon. – Wed., Fri.: 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Thursday: 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.
For more information, visit: www.colum.edu/Academics/Interarts/book-and-paper/

The Center for Book and Paper Arts (CBPA) is dedicated to the research, teaching, and promotion of the interdisciplinary practices that support the book arts and hand papermaking as contemporary art media. The CBPA is part of the Interdisciplinary Arts Department at Columbia College Chicago, and in addition to housing both graduate and undergraduate classes for that department, it publishes a critical journal and artists’ books, mounts exhibitions, hosts artist residencies, sponsors symposia and public programs, and provides advanced study through a workshop program.

Columbia College Chicago is an urban institution that offers innovative degree programs in the visual, performing, media and communication arts for more than 10,000 students in 120 undergraduate and graduate programs. An arts and media college committed to a rigorous liberal arts curriculum, Columbia is dedicated to opportunity and excellence in higher education. For further information, visit www.colum.edu.

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Media Contact:
Cara Birch, 312.369.8695, cbirch@colum.edu

Posted on Jan 1, 2014

Post by Media Relations Assistant

Categories: Press Releases 0 Comments

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